The Sick Man of Europe (A)

Season 2018 / 2019 – Talk 10 A – The Sick Man of Europe and the Berlin Conference of 1878 (A)

Please note: this talk is in two parts. Please scroll down to the second part after listening to Part A.

Peter Duffy tells us about the fate of Turkey and the Ottoman Empire in The Sick Man of Europe and the Berlin Conference of 1878.

The conference led to changes in the countries allocated to the different European Empires in both the Balkans and Mediterranean. The Sick Man of Europe and the Berlin Conference of 1878 describes the different policies driving the key attendees.

Britain was keen to protect the Suez Canal and India from Russian aspirations and so supported Turkey. In addition Britain gained Cyprus at the conference. Austro Hungary received states in the Balkans. Germany wanted to consolidate its position and alliances.

The ‘carve up’ described in The Sick Man of Europe and the Berlin Conference of 1878 ultimately laid the foundations for the First World War.

Click here to open the presentation that accompanies this talk.

Please note: there is a slight echo on the recording and some disturbance from builders renovating the room next to the meeting room.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The music Media Magazine used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A History Group 2019

The Sick Man of Europe (B)


Season 2018 / 2019 – Talk 10 B – The Sick Man of Europe and the Berlin Conference of 1878 (B)

Peter Duffy tells us about the fate of Turkey and the Ottoman Empire in The Sick Man of Europe and the Berlin Conference of 1878.

The conference led to changes in the countries allocated to the different European Empires in both the Balkans and Mediterranean. The Sick Man of Europe and the Berlin Conference of 1878 describes the different policies driving the key attendees.

Britain was keen to protect the Suez Canal and India from Russian aspirations and so supported Turkey. In addition Britain gained Cyprus at the conference. Austro Hungary received states in the Balkans. Germany wanted to consolidate its position and alliances.

The ‘carve up’ described in The Sick Man of Europe and the Berlin Conference of 1878 ultimately laid the foundations for the First World War.

Click here to open the presentation that accompanies this talk.

Please note: there is a slight echo on the recording and some disturbance from builders renovating the room next to the meeting room.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The music Media Magazine used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A History Group 2019

Darwin and Evolution (A) – Talking History with Farnham U3A

Season 2018 / 2019 – Talk 9 A – Darwin and Evolution (A)

Sam Osmond tells the story of the life of the Victorian scientist Charles Darwin and his theory of Evolution in Darwin and Evolution (A).

We hear about his early life, and how he went to Edinburgh to study to be a doctor. Sam tells us about his time at Cambridge where he was studying to become a clergyman. As Darwin was more interested in entomology, botany and geology he only got an ‘ordinary’ degree.

He was lucky to get a berth on the 5 year voyage of the Beagle. We hear of the visits the Galapagos Islands. There Darwin saw an amazing range of wildlife and geology. He studied the wildlife and noted the difference in the finches on different islands.

In Darwin and Evolution (A) Sam discusses the books he published and how some Christians were, and still are, offended by them.

Please note: there is a slight echo on the recording and some disturbance from builders renovating the room next to the meeting room.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The music Media Magazine used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A History Group 2019

Darwin and Evolution (B) – Talking History with Farnham U3A

Season 2018 / 2019 – Talk 9 – Darwin and Evolution B

Sam Osmond continues the story about the life of the Victorian scientist Charles Darwin and his theory of Evolution in Darwin and Evolution (B) .

We hear about Herbert Spence, a leading Victorian philosopher, and his  ideas about evolution. Sam discusses selective breeding, a topic Plato wrote about over 2,000 years ago. 18th century selective breeding ‘improved’ livestock.

We learn that DNA analysis of fossils supports the theories discussed in Darwin and Evolution (B).

Please note: there is a slight echo on the recording and some disturbance from builders renovating the room next to the meeting room.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The music Media Magazine used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A History Group 2019

The Austro Hungarian Empire (a) – Talking History with Farnham U3A

Season 2018 / 2019 – Talk 8 a

in the Austro Hungarian Empire (a) Jo Huddleston tells us about the early years of the Empire. He tells us that there were Prime Ministers in both Austria and Hungary. He discusses the stress this caused and the need for the Emperor to keep tight control.

We hear about the suicide of Franz Joseph’s son and how Franz Ferdinand became the heir apparent.

We also learn about the international weakness of the Austro Hungarian Empire (a) and the threats from other nations.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The music Media Magazine used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A History Group 2019

The Austro Hungarian Empire (b) – Talking History with Farnham U3A

Season 2018 / 2019 – Talk 8 b

The Austro Hungarian Empire (b) continues Jo’s talk. Jo picks up the story in the 1880s, and tells us about the period to the Empire’s dissolution in 1918.

We hear about the lack of democratic government and the stress caused by the differences between Austria and Hungary. Franz Joseph was the Emperor from 1867 to 1916. He governed for much of the time with just a few ministers and a small Civil Service.

Jo also talks about the institutional antisemitism, particularly in Vienna. This had a major effect on an aspiring, but relatively unsuccessful, artist living in Vienna at the time.

Jo tells us how the visit by Arch Duke Franz Ferdinand to Sarajevo went ahead even though the threat level was known. As we know, this led to World War 1.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The music Media Magazine used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A History Group 2019

From Faraday to Ferranti (a) – Talking History with Farnham U3A – S2018/9 07A

In From Faraday to Ferranti (a) Trevor tells us about the career of Michael Faraday. The son of a blacksmith with only a basic formal education he was a brilliant intuitive scientist. He was apprenticed to a bookbinder when he was 14. He read many of the books in order to improve himself.

In those days public displays of scientific experiments were popular. Faraday went to those held at the Royal Institution in London. Faraday became assistant to Sir Humphrey Davy in 1812.

Faraday toured Europe with Davy in 1813 / 1814 and met many of Europe’s scientists. Faraday continued to work for the Royal Institution until his death in 1867.

The talk continues with descriptions of Faraday’s experiments into electro-magnetism.

From Faraday to Ferranti (a) ends with a brief introduction to Sebastian de Ferranti. Listen to Part B to find out more about Ferranti.

Click on the link to open the  presentation that accompanies the talk.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The music Media Magazine used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A History Group 2019

From Faraday to Ferranti (b) – Talking History with Farnham U3A – S2018/9 07B

Faraday to Ferranti (b) continues Trevor’s talk about the career of Ferranti. It starts with the Grosvenor Gallery project. Ferranti redesigned the system and made it very successful.

Faraday to Ferranti (b) starts with his work at the London Electric Supply Corporation where he was Chief Engineer. He designed the Deptford Power Station to provide a high voltage electricity supply. The talk continues with how the high voltage was to be converted to one that could be used domestically.

Ferranti developed a high voltage cable and the description about how this was created is fascinating – considering the technology available at that time. Some of the cable was still in use in 1933.

The talk continues with the Marindin report about the electricity supply industry in London. The report recommended that the companies should have specific supply areas. The one given to the London Electric Supply Corporation was too small for the Deptford Power Station to operate economically without major modification. This led to Ferranti’s departure.

Ferranti opened business in Lancashire making equipment for the power supply industry. At it’s peak the business employed 20,000.

Click on the link to open the Presentation for this part of the talk.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The music Media Magazine used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A History Group 2019

Talking History with Farnham U3A – Kitchener – S2018/9 06

In Kitchener, Alan Bridgeman focuses on the campaign to avenge the death of General Gordon. His main source is the book With Kitchener to Khartoum, written by the Daily Mail journalist G W Steevens who covered the campaign. The book is written in the style of the time and might not be considered to be ‘politically correct’ today.

A number of journalists covered the campaign against the army of Abdullah al-Taashi, the Khalifa. He was the successor to the Mahdi.

The talk is full of observations made by Steevens in the period before the battle as well as his description of the battle and its aftermath.

The talk concludes with Kitchener’s role in the First World War and his death when HMS Hampshire sank after hitting a mine in 1916.

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Please note: The graphics included in this post may differ from those used in the original talk for copyright reasons.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The music Media Magazine used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A History Group 2019

The White Rajahs of Sarawak (a) – Talking History with Farnham U3A – S2018/9 05A

The White Rajahs of Sarawak tells the story of the Brooke family’s rule of Sarawak. They ruled for 100 years from 1841 until the Japanese Invasion in December 1941.

The talk starts with some of the history of the area in the centuries preceding the arrival of James Brooke. James used an inheritance to purchase a schooner in which he sailed to Singapore. He then sailed to Sarawak and by quelling a rebellion he managed to gain control of Sarawak.

James, whose hero was Sir Stamford Raffles, ran Sarawak very differently to the normal British way. He spent much of his time with the indigenous inhabitants and became highly respected by those he ruled.

James handed over the rule of Sarawak to his nephew Charles and retired to England.

The White Rajahs of Sarawak is a fascinating story about Imperialism in the mid-19th century.

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Please note: The graphics included in this post may differ from those used in the original talk for copyright reasons.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The music Media Magazine used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A History Group 2019

The White Rajahs of Sarawak (b) – Talking History with Farnham U3A – S2018/9 05B

The White Rajahs of Sarawak tells the story of the Brooke family’s rule of Sarawak. The rule lasted for 100 years from 1841 until the Japanese Invasion in December 1941.

Jenny picks up the story of the Brooke family following the departure of James in the second part of the White Rajahs of Sarawak. She starts with his nephew Charles, who lacked his uncle’s charm, had a great empathy with the Dayaks.

Charles returned to England after the death of his Uncle to find a wife. His wife, Margaret, found to Sarawak be beautiful when she joined him.

Jenny tells the story of the strife between the two brothers, Vyner and Bertram, over the years. The country became a British Colony in 1946; it was Britain’s last Colony!

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Please note: The graphics included in this post may differ from those used in the original talk for copyright reasons.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The music Media Magazine used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A History Group 2019

Talking History with Farnham U3A – 1869 – S2018/9 06A

Welcome to 2019! Welcome to this review of the year 1869 where Michael A’Bear delves back 150 years. In his talk he gives us a flavour of the people and events of that year.

It’s an average year, he suggests, but includes the birth of Rasputin, the death of Hector Berlioz and the opening of the first Sainsbury store. The Cutty Sark, the last tea clipper, was launched (now preserved at Greenwich), Ghandi was born and ex. US President, the unpopular, Franklin Pierce died.

Listen to the podcast and hear more about these events and also the others that Michael covers.

Click on a graphic to open the gallery:

Please note: The graphics included in this post may differ from those used in the original talk for copyright reasons.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The music Media Magazine used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A History Group 2019

Talking History with Farnham U3A – The Strange Death of Liberal England – part A – S2018/9 04A

In the Strange Death of Liberal England – Part A Robert Sykes follows the book by George Dangerfield published in 1935.

The book follows the difficulties faced by the Liberal Government in dealing with the House of Lords, the ‘Irish Question’, the women’s suffrage and the trade unions. This was the period when the Liberal Party was still seen as the party of the working man.  At this time both the Labour and Irish Nationalist MPs supported the Liberal Government.

The book was first published in New York by Harrison Smith & Robert Hass. The book was soon out of print as the publishers went bankrupt. An edited edition was published in Britain in 1936.

This talk has been split into two sections to make it more convenient to listen to.

Click on a graphic to open the gallery:

Please note: It has not been possible to include all the graphics used in the original talk due to copyright considerations.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The music Media Magazine used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A History Group 2018

Talking History with Farnham U3A – The Strange Death of Liberal England – part B – S2018/9 04B

In the second part of his talk on the Strange Death of Liberal England Robert talks about the discord that existed in Britain in 1914 immediately prior to the start of the First World War.

From a situation of strife where the Government was suffering problems with the Suffragettes, in Ireland over Home Rule and a ‘triple alliance’ of the Trade Unions, the declaration of war resulted in all sides uniting against a common enemy.

This talk has been split into two sections to make it more convenient to listen to.

Click on a graphic to open the gallery:

Please note: It has not been possible to include all the graphics used in the original talk due to copyright considerations.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The music Media Magazine used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A History Group 2018

U3A Open Meeting – Theme Africa – the Three Rivers

Welcome to this podcast of the Farnham U3A open meeting on this year’s theme Africa where Michael A’Bear talks about the explorers of the Three Rivers of equatorial Africa- the Congo, Zambezi and the Nile.

The Annual Theme meetings are open to all Farnham U3A members. Meetings are usually held each month in the Barley Room of the Farnham Maltings (Maximum capacity 100 people). Most of the meetings are free, however some are ticketed.

This podcast has been released so that those members who were not able to be present have the opportunity to listen to the talk.

Imagine we are in the raging heat of Africa…….

The characters in this story were difficult people. One could be called surly, another was a violent bully. Others included a cheat and others were larger than life characters.

Michael starts by reviewing David Livingstone whose discoveries made him famous rather than his work as a missionary, where it is believed he only converted one person. The talk continues with Henry Morton Stanley (real name John Rowlands) who was born in Wales. He had gone to sea and then jumped ship in the USA. He served on both sides in the American Civil War and then became a journalist for the New York Herald.

Michael continues with Burton and Speke’s expedition, two people who didn’t like each other! Having returned to England Speke got funding for another expedition, this time with James Augustus Grant.

Michael then explores the career of Sam Baker. Baker has been described as being like Speke on Caffeine. He was disappointed that the source of the Nile had been discovered so set off and discovered Lake Albert.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The theme music Local History 1960s used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

This podcast is also available on iTunes, Spotify and Stitcher.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A 2018

U3A Open Meeting – Theme Africa – the French Foreign Legion

Welcome to this podcast of the Farnham U3A open meeting on this year’s theme Africa where Joanne Watson talks about the French Foreign Legion.

The Annual Theme is open to all Farnham U3A members. Meetings are usually held each month in the Barley Room of the Farnham Maltings (Maximum capacity 100 people). Most of the meetings are free, however some others are ticketed.

This podcast has been released so that those members who were not able to be present have the opportunity to listen to the talk.

Joanne covers the fascinating history of the Legion. She starts with the origins of the legion. Then she covers it’s successes and failures through the decades. Having started as part of the French push into Africa, with its main base in Algeria, the role has evolved and it has fought in many theatres across the world.

Please click on a graphic to open the gallery:

Please note: all the pictures accompanying this podcast are stated as being in the Public Domain.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The theme music Local History 1960s used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

This podcast is also available on iTunes, Spotify and Stitcher.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A 2018

Talking History with Farnham U3A – Exhibition Fever in the 19th Century – part A – S2018/9 03A

In the first part of her talk on the Exhibition Fever in  the 19th Century Joanne talks about exhibitions that preceded the Great Exhibition of 1851. She then talks in detail about the Great Exhibition.

After listening to Joanne please follow this link to see the V&A material.

This talk has been split into two sections to make it more convenient to listen to.

Please click on a graphic to open the gallery:

Please note: It has not been possible to include all the graphics used in the original talk due to copyright considerations.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The music Media Magazine used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

This podcast is also available on iTunes, Spotify and Stitcher.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A History Group 2018

Talking History with Farnham U3A – Exhibition Fever in the 19th Century – part B – S2018/9 03B

In the second part of her talk on the Exhibition Fever of the 19th Century Joanne talks about some of those that followed the Great Exhibition of 1851.

There were many, both in Europe and across the Atlantic.

This talk has been split into two sections to make it more convenient to listen to.

Click on a graphic to open the gallery:

Please note: It has not been possible to include all the graphics used in the original talk due to copyright considerations.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The music Media Magazine used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A History Group 2018

Talking History with Farnham U3A – The Boer War and other Colonial Adventures – part A – S2018/9 02A

In the first part of the Boer War and Other Colonial Adventures Richard Thomas starts by talking about the Colonial tensions in southern Africa. He discusses parts played by the key players in the lead up to the war and their different viewpoints.

He covers the Boer sieges of Ladysmith, Kimberley and Mafeking and the difficulties that the British Army, initially led by Redvers Buller, had in relieving Ladysmith and the defeat of the British Army at Spion Kop.

These talks are split into sections of around 20 minutes to make them more convenient to listen to.

Click on a graphic to open the gallery:

Please note: It has not been possible to include all the graphics used in the original talk due to copyright considerations.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The music Media Magazine used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A History Group 2018

Talking History with Farnham U3A – The Boer War and other Colonial Adventures – part B – S2018/9 02B

In the second part of his talk on the Boer War and other Colonial Adventures Richard Thomas discusses the replacement of Redvers Buller by Lord Roberts and Lord Kitchener.

The arrival of these two  new Army leaders brings a much tougher regime for conducting the war with a scorched earth policy as a response to the Boer guerrilla warfare, the building of armed blockhouses and the introduction of concentration camps for Boer civilians.

Richard points out that the disregard for the health of the internees by the Roberts and Kitchener was equalled by their disregard for the welfare of their soldiers. Things only improved for the civilian prisoners when the responsibility for the management of the camps was handed over to Milner.

This was all a PR disaster and although Britain won the war it lost the peace.

These talks are split into sections of around 20 minutes to make them more convenient to listen to.

Click on a graphic to open the gallery:

Please note: It has not been possible to include all the graphics used in the original talk due to copyright considerations.

The Farnham U3A site is at Farnham U3A Home Page.

The music Media Magazine used in this podcast is licensed from AKM Music.

© The MrT Podcast Studio and Farnham U3A History Group 2018